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  1. #1
    teapot's Avatar
    Join Date : Apr 2013
    Posts : 1,090

    Using Gmail as an example - I can't fathom ever having my Gmail hacked in the traditional sense. The password is something along the lines of 4X^@AyvSWzp4sK6GxPe4 (or whatever Last Pass threw out that day) so surely a flag would come up somewhere by the time someone had started trying to hack in.

    And where would they start anyway? Wouldn't they at least need to get hold of the hashed password and contained information first, and then try working it out from there? I certainly can't imagine that anyone log's onto gmail.com with an email address and starts trying to guess passwords...

    So I guess the only thing I can really think of being a possibility is if I were to log into someone else's computer that wasn't secure, or had some key logging nasties on it that would pinch my password and without two step, they could get into my account.

    I guess social engineering is a big one as well...

    I've heard that having two step can be quite a bit of hassle when using on the actual mobile, I haven't used it.

    To be fair, it's obviously something I'm not too clued up, lot's of people say that it's worth doing so smoke / fire etc etc...

    Just wondered if there were any supporting thought's for two step being more hassle than it's worth or whether it was done unanimously.
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  2. #2

    In my line of work I am forced to use two factor authentication for many things. At first I was reluctant but have grown to appreciate the added security it brings. I now use it for personal things as well, such as gmail, facebook and more.

    Two factor has been around for years. When I was in the military we used RSA key fobs and Novell to log into Windows NT machines. This was in the 90's. Now it works with smart phones.

    It is not a hassle. The time it takes to look at your phone and type in a code that is sent to you is no hassle considering how much more secure your account is.

    The real questions is. Is your account and data stored within not worth the hassle?
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  3. #3
    teapot's Avatar
    Join Date : Apr 2013
    Posts : 1,090

    Quote Originally Posted by ZeroByte, post: 1074881, member: 80798
    The real questions is. Is your account and data stored within not worth the hassle?
    True, I agree... There's an element of devils advocate in this message I guess. I've just set up two step on my gmail account and other than re-entering a long password a couple of times it was pretty simple to set up on my phone as well.
    Although the browsers now being a bit awkward, it'll sort itself out I'm sure.
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  4. #4

    It doesn't matter how secure one's password is. If the password is stored in a data base that gets hacked, the hackers will have it. Two factor authentication reduces that risk dramatically.
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  5. #5
    teapot's Avatar
    Join Date : Apr 2013
    Posts : 1,090

    Quote Originally Posted by Lady Fitzgerald, post: 1074952, member: 103513
    It doesn't matter how secure one's password is. If the password is stored in a data base that gets hacked, the hackers will have it. Two factor authentication reduces that risk dramatically.
    Yes - If I'm using a forum and have a user name / password and email notifications on then they could be stored into a database that (if it's a small forum) isn't very well encrypted.

    I don't link my main email address to forums, It's separate. And every password that is used on forums is unique, so having that password wouldn't grant them access to the email account used for on-line forums etc.

    I would imagine that a database used by Google would be a pretty tall order for any hacker to gain access to, and that the main threat (of someone gaining access to a database with your details on it) would come from smaller on-line forums. I'm probably naive on that though.

    As I said I set up two step earlier, I'm just curious to hear what others thought
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  6. #6
    z3r010's Avatar
    Join Date : Nov 2010
    Standish, Lancashire
    Posts : 980
    Windows 10
    England uk lancashire

    I use two step verification on pretty much everything I can, it can be a pain when you use a new device, but for things like paypal I use my paypal/verisign card after login it feels lots safer.
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  7. #7
    teapot's Avatar
    Join Date : Apr 2013
    Posts : 1,090

    yeah I've seen those little things, like the ones some banks use now (or do all banks use them except halifax?)

    I'm all two stepped up.... there really isn't any reason not to. :mrgreen:
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